How the Rooster got his ‘Cock-a-Doodle-doo’

by Daniel Mackie September 06, 2012

cockerel watercolour in progress

This watercolour in progress is sticking with my theme of animals in the natural habitat but with their natural habitat inside them, albeit stylised. ( the blobs on his tail is masking fluid)

Why do roosters ‘Cock-a-Doodle-doo’ in the morning. The greek myth about Alectryon explains, naturally it involves an illicit affair and a tragedy!

The god Ares (Greek god of war) instructed Alectryon to stand outside his door while he had an illicit lovemaking session with Aphrodite (the goddess of love) It seems like this lovemaking session was tantric because it went on for some time, Alectryon fell asleep on his guard duty. Helios (the Sun god) walked in on the couple. Ares as punishment turned Alectryon into a rooster, which never forgets to announce the arrival of the sun in the morning.

View prints and cards available at Daniel’s shop The DM Collection





Daniel Mackie
Daniel Mackie

Author



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News / Work in progress / Mythology

Ungodly Powers

by Harry Miller October 03, 2019

Being that the Stag Beetle is active during the hot summer nights, and due to the fact that they’re attracted to bright lights, it has been know for them crash in though an open bedroom window; and being that they’re Britains largest terrestrial insect, which limits them to certain ungainly flight, “crashing” is probably the appropriate term.  

Read More

Turtles All The Way Down

by Harry Miller October 01, 2019

Anyone who has ever read one of Terry Pratchett’s fantasy ‘Discworld’ novels will know that the fictional flat Discworld rests upon the backs of four gigantic elephants, who, in turn, spin the world whilst walking on the shell of the enormous Turtle, ‘Great A’Tuin’.  

Read More

I Wish to Not Be Eaten

by Harry Miller October 01, 2019

It was the Romans who first brought us the age old wishbone superstition: in which you take the wishbone, or furcula (“little fork” in Latin), from the carcass of a fowl, dry it out, and snap it in two with a fellow wish-maker; the wish being granted to the person with the largest half.

Read More